Fire Department

Fire Safety Information

 
 

Fire statistics

NFPA produces reports and statistics on the loss of life and property from fire.

Fire in the United States - 2015

Fires in the U.S.

In 2015, there were 1,345,500 fires reported in the United States. These fires caused 3,280 civilian deaths, 15,700 civilian injuries, and $14.3 billion in property damage.
  • 501,500 were structure fires, causing 2,685 civilian deaths, 13,000 civilian injuries, and $10.3 billion in property damage.
  • 204,500 were vehicle fires, causing 500 civilian fire deaths, 1,875 civilian fire injuries, and $1.8 billion in property damage.
  • 639,500 were outside and other fires, causing 95 civilian fire deaths, 825 civilian fire injuries, and $252 million in property damage.

The 2015 U.S. fire loss clock a fire department responded to a fire every 23 seconds. One structure fire was reported every 63 seconds.

  • One home structure fire was reported every 86 seconds.
  • One civilian fire injury was reported every 34 minutes. 
  • One civilian fire death occurred every 2 hours and 40 minutes.
  • One outside and other fire was reported every 52 seconds.
  • One highway vehicle fire was reported every 3 minutes 1 seconds.

 

Total cost of fire

Report: NFPA's "The Total Cost of Fire in the United States" (PDF, 725 KB)

Author: John R. Hall, Jr.

Issued: March 2014

Includes human and economic losses, costs of the fire service, built-in fire protection, and costs associated with the insurance industry.

 

Executive Summary

In 2011 the total cost of fire is estimated at $329 billion, or roughly 2.1% of U.S. gross domestic product. The components are as follows:

It should be clear that most of the analysis supporting these estimates is soft and has wide bands of uncertainty. Nevertheless, the conclusion that fire has a tremendous impact on the way the U.S. uses its resources is indisputable.

It also is clear that we have a dual interest in reducing U.S. fire losses – which include human losses that are among the highest per capita in the industrial world – and in seeking ways to achieve equivalent fire safety at lower costs, since the growth in total cost of fire has been led not by the fire losses but by the other cost components. This provides a clear indication of need for product innovations or other programs (e.g., residential sprinklers, educational programs) that can improve fire safety at the same or lower costs. It also shows the need for improved methods (e.g., models) for calculating fire performance and costs, so the implications of different choices can be considered and judged more comprehensively.

Several of the formulas in this report have been reworked, with results recalculated back to 1980. This report should be used in place of all earlier reports for all years.

Click this link to see NFPA Fire Loss in the United States in 2015

 

 

     
     
     

 

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